The chronicles of England, though sometimes shrouded by mists of time, reveal from early records that the surname Wiggett was of Norman origin. The history of this name is interwoven into the colourful fabric of history of Britain.

Careful research by professional analysts using such ancient manuscripts as the Domesday Book (compiled in 1086 by William the Conqueror), the Ragman Rolls, the Wave poem, the Honour Roll of the Battel Abbey, The Curia Regis, Pipe Rolls, the Falaise Roll, tax records, baptismals, family genealogies, and local parish and church records, determined that the name Wiggett was first found in Lincolnshire where they were anciently seated as Lords of the Manor. The Saxon influence of English history diminished after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courtes was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed. But Saxon surnames survived and the family name was first referenced in the year 1066 after the Norman Conquest when Wigot or Wigod (one of the most powerful Baron Norman origin of Bigot) from castles and lands. William Bigot was the brother of Roger Bigot and the second son of Robert Bigot became to the conquest by Apula from Italy. The name became Wiggett.

Many alternate spellings of the name were foundl. They were typically linked to a common root, usually one of the Norman nobles at the Battle of Hastings. The name, Wiggett, occured in many references, and from time to time, the surname included the spellings of Wiggett, Wicket, Wickett, Wicketts, Wiggat, Wiggatt, Wigot, Wiket, Wyket, Vigot, Vigott, Wiggot, Wiggott, FitzBigot, and many more. Scribes recorded and spelled the name as it sounded. It was not unlikely that a person would be born with one spelling, married with another, and buried with a headstone which showed another. Sometimes preferences for different spelling variations were due to a division of the family, or, had religious or patriotic reasons.

The ancestors of the family name Wiggett are believed to be descended originally from the Norman race. The normans were commonly believed to be of French origin but, more accurately, they were of Viking origin. The Vikings, under their Jarl, Thorfinn Rollo, invaded France in about 911 A.D. After Rollo laid siege to Paris, the French King, Charles the Simple, finally conceded defeat, granting northern France to Rollo. Rollo became the first Duke of Normandy, and Duke William, who invaded and defeated England in 1066, was in fact descended from Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy.

Duke William took a census of most of England in 1086, and recorded it in the Domesday Book. A family name capable of being tracked back to this document, or to Hastings, was a mark of honour for most families during the Middle Ages, and even to this day.

The surname Wiggett emerged as a notable English family name in Lincolnshire where they were anciently seated at his Castle. William Wigot held lands in Warwickshire in 1185. Later, in they held a castle in Worcestershire they were also shown on tax records at John Wigod held at 1284. From their early beginnings, for the next few centuries, bearers of the family name acquired estates and manors as they established themselves throughout England. Major conflicts, such as the Wards of the Roses (1455-1487), and the Cromwellian Civil Wards (17th century), sometimes found family members to be in opposing camps, with conflicting interests. They became held at Sandborn in Warwickhire. Of note amongst the family at this time was the Wiggett family of Lincolnshire and Warwickshire.

The surname Wiggett contributed much to local politics and in the affairs of England or Scotland. During the 12th century many of these Norman families moved north to Scotland, following Earl David of Huntingdon who would become King of Scotland. Later, in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries, England and Scotland were ravaged by religious and political conflict. The Monarchy, the Church and Parliament fought for supremacy. The unrest caused many to think of distant lands.

Settlers in Ireland became known as the "Adventurers for land in Ireland." They "undertook" to keep the Protestant faith, and were granted lands previously owned by the Irish. The name Wiggett may well have arrived in Ireland with the "Cromwellian Aventurers for Land",; in the 17th century. At that time, 1,000 acres of land was available to settlers in Ulster for 200 euros, in Connaught for 300 euros, and in Leinster for 600 euros.

The news and rumours of opportunities in the New World spread like wildfire. Many sailed aboard the fleet of sailing ships known as the "White Sails."

In North America, immigrants who shared the family name Wiggett, or one of its spelling variations included Joseph Wickett, who came to Maryland in 1666; Danl Wicket, an emigrant in bondage on record in Potomac in 1743; Richard Wicket, an English Minister, who arrived in Barbados in 1803; H. Wiggett, who arrived in San Francisco in 1852; as well as William R. Wiggett, who was Naturalized in Philadelphia in 1875. From the port of arrival many settlers joined the wagon trains westward. During the American War of Independence some declared their loyalty to the Crown, moved northward into Canade and became known as the United Empire Loyalists.

In recent history, notable bearers of the Wiggett surname include: Darwin Wiggett, Canadian photographer; and Fred H. Wickett, American oil operator in the 1920s, namesake of Wickett, Texas.

There are also traces to the most ancient grant of Coat of Arms from the brances which developed their own Arms.

The most ancient grant of a Coat of Arms found was a gold shield with three blue stars pierced, red and on a black wavy chief, a dove reguardant. The Crest was a dove reguardant holding in the beak an olive branch all proper. The coat of arms found for a bearer of the Wiggett surname did not include the motto. Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and many families have chosen not to display a motto.


Jim Wiggett
Pleasanton, CA
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Peggy Wiggett
Pleasanton, CA
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Lauren Wiggett
Pleasanton, CA
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Courtney Wiggett
Pleasanton, CA
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